photojojo:

A photo that is nothing less than amazing.
Air by Jonathan Wade

photojojo:

A photo that is nothing less than amazing.

Air by Jonathan Wade


Freedom House’s 2010 study of women’s rights

Freedom House conducted a comprehensive study of women’s rights in the region.  The present edition offers an updated examination of the issue, with a special focus on changes that have occurred over the last five years. Although the study indicates that a substantial deficit in women’s rights persists in every country in the MENA region, the findings also include notable progress, particularly in terms of economic opportunities, educational attainment, and political participation.


The results, by country, can be found here:

http://www.freedomhouse.org/template.cfm?page=383&report=86


Women’s Rights in the Middle East and North Africa: Supporting the Fight for Freedom and Equality


Bulgarian TV reporter in action.

Bulgarian TV reporter in action.


Stephanie Sinclair / VII
Police woman Malalai Kakar arrests Janan, 35, after he tried to kill his fifteen-year-old wife Jamila (which means beautiful in Arabic) in Kandahar, Afghanistan on June 4, 2006. Jamila angered him by fleeing her home to stay with her mother after enduring years of abuse from her husband and mother-in-law. Janan came to the mother’s house to kill Jamila for leaving their home, and ended up stabbing Jamila’s grandmother multiple times as well, when she tried to cover Jamila with her body to protect her. Jamila was engaged when she was only a 1-year-old and was married at 10. As a premature bride, she lacked the skills to be a proper wife, which resulted in the abuse she received. Jamila’s mother, Malika, said, “I kept my daughter at my house and hoped to explain to my son-in-law why he should not beat her, but he barged into the house and tried to kill her.”
This photograph may seem confusing without the caption but with the description, it makes more sense. The anger on the girl’s husband’s face is apparent, and even though you cannot see the girl’s face or reaction, the blood stains on her sleeve substitute just as well.

Stephanie Sinclair / VII

Police woman Malalai Kakar arrests Janan, 35, after he tried to kill his fifteen-year-old wife Jamila (which means beautiful in Arabic) in Kandahar, Afghanistan on June 4, 2006. Jamila angered him by fleeing her home to stay with her mother after enduring years of abuse from her husband and mother-in-law. Janan came to the mother’s house to kill Jamila for leaving their home, and ended up stabbing Jamila’s grandmother multiple times as well, when she tried to cover Jamila with her body to protect her. Jamila was engaged when she was only a 1-year-old and was married at 10. As a premature bride, she lacked the skills to be a proper wife, which resulted in the abuse she received. Jamila’s mother, Malika, said, “I kept my daughter at my house and hoped to explain to my son-in-law why he should not beat her, but he barged into the house and tried to kill her.”

This photograph may seem confusing without the caption but with the description, it makes more sense. The anger on the girl’s husband’s face is apparent, and even though you cannot see the girl’s face or reaction, the blood stains on her sleeve substitute just as well.


Stephanie Sinclair / VII
Faiz Mohammed, 40, and Ghulam Haider, 11, sit in her home prior to their wedding in the rural Damarda Village, Afghnanistan on Sept. 11, 2005. Ghulam said she is sad to be getting engaged as she wanted to be a teacher. Her favorite class was Dari, the local language, before she was made to drop out of school. Married girls are seldom found in school, limiting their economic and social opportunities. Parents sometimes remove their daughters from school to protect them from the possibility of sexual activity outside of wedlock. It is hard to say exactly how many young marriages take place, but according to the Afghan women’s ministry and women’s NGOs, approximately 57 percent of Afghan girls get married before the legal age of 16. In addition, once the girl’s father has agreed to the engagement, she is pulled out of school immediately. Early pregnancies also result in an increase in complications during child birth.This image is from a series by photographer, Stephanie Sinclair, titled “Child Brides Afghanistan”. There is  not much in the image besides the girl and the man. How they are posed next to each other makes their age difference seem greater and more apparent.
A story that also goes with this photo:
http://www.themuslimwoman.org/entry/young-brides-a-miserable-life-for-little-girls-in-saudi-arabia/

Stephanie Sinclair / VII

Faiz Mohammed, 40, and Ghulam Haider, 11, sit in her home prior to their wedding in the rural Damarda Village, Afghnanistan on Sept. 11, 2005. Ghulam said she is sad to be getting engaged as she wanted to be a teacher. Her favorite class was Dari, the local language, before she was made to drop out of school. Married girls are seldom found in school, limiting their economic and social opportunities. Parents sometimes remove their daughters from school to protect them from the possibility of sexual activity outside of wedlock. It is hard to say exactly how many young marriages take place, but according to the Afghan women’s ministry and women’s NGOs, approximately 57 percent of Afghan girls get married before the legal age of 16. In addition, once the girl’s father has agreed to the engagement, she is pulled out of school immediately. Early pregnancies also result in an increase in complications during child birth.
This image is from a series by photographer, Stephanie Sinclair, titled “Child Brides Afghanistan”. There is  not much in the image besides the girl and the man. How they are posed next to each other makes their age difference seem greater and more apparent.

A story that also goes with this photo:

http://www.themuslimwoman.org/entry/young-brides-a-miserable-life-for-little-girls-in-saudi-arabia/


Lynsey Addario / VII Network
Farzana winces in pain as she has her bandages changed in the private clinic of Fatima Mohammadi, a nurse at the hospital in Herat, Afghanistan on Aug. 5, 2010. Farzana tried to commit suicide by self-immolation after being beaten by her in-laws. Farzana and her brother were engaged to two siblings, and when Farzana’s brother took another woman, Farzana suffered the wrath of her in-laws as retaliation; she burned herself to escape the abuse. Hundreds, if not thousands, of Afghan women commit suicide by self-immolation each year to escape abusive marriages and in-laws; divorce is considered too shameful of an option for a woman who wants to leave a marriage, and thus suicide is a more viable option. As Afghanistan continues along the path of war and economic recession, the number grows.
This photograph is a part of a series, Self-Immogenation-Afghanistan, by photographer Lynsey Addario. Looking at the pain on the woman’s face and scarred body, it is hard to to wince thinking about how much pain the woman must be in. There is not much background, the white wall makes the woman stand out even more in the image.

Lynsey Addario / VII Network

Farzana winces in pain as she has her bandages changed in the private clinic of Fatima Mohammadi, a nurse at the hospital in Herat, Afghanistan on Aug. 5, 2010. Farzana tried to commit suicide by self-immolation after being beaten by her in-laws. Farzana and her brother were engaged to two siblings, and when Farzana’s brother took another woman, Farzana suffered the wrath of her in-laws as retaliation; she burned herself to escape the abuse. Hundreds, if not thousands, of Afghan women commit suicide by self-immolation each year to escape abusive marriages and in-laws; divorce is considered too shameful of an option for a woman who wants to leave a marriage, and thus suicide is a more viable option. As Afghanistan continues along the path of war and economic recession, the number grows.

This photograph is a part of a series, Self-Immogenation-Afghanistan, by photographer Lynsey Addario. Looking at the pain on the woman’s face and scarred body, it is hard to to wince thinking about how much pain the woman must be in. There is not much background, the white wall makes the woman stand out even more in the image.


Lynsey Addario / VII Network
Shamsia Jafari, 17, an Afghan schoolgirl who had her face burned and scarred with acid by Taliban sympathizers as she was walking to school on Nov. 12, attends the Mirwais Mena school in Kandahar, Afghanistan on Feb. 7, 2009. Most of the girls at the Mirwais Mena school have resumed attending, despite constant threats to their safety. Afghanistan has been plagued by war for three decades, and Afghans continue to struggle with severe poverty and a gross lack of security in many areas across the country.
This image is of just the girl’s face and is cropped tightly so her face fills the entire frame. This is effective because it shows not only the result of what happened to her but the emotion in her face, without needing to be a head on shot or a lot of light highlighting her entire face.

Lynsey Addario / VII Network

Shamsia Jafari, 17, an Afghan schoolgirl who had her face burned and scarred with acid by Taliban sympathizers as she was walking to school on Nov. 12, attends the Mirwais Mena school in Kandahar, Afghanistan on Feb. 7, 2009. Most of the girls at the Mirwais Mena school have resumed attending, despite constant threats to their safety. Afghanistan has been plagued by war for three decades, and Afghans continue to struggle with severe poverty and a gross lack of security in many areas across the country.

This image is of just the girl’s face and is cropped tightly so her face fills the entire frame. This is effective because it shows not only the result of what happened to her but the emotion in her face, without needing to be a head on shot or a lot of light highlighting her entire face.


"Islamist insurgents have banned unrelated men and women from shaking hands, speaking or walking together."
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/10/somali-islamists-shaking-_n_806902.html
The image captures the mood and atmosphere of the protest and the protesters.

"Islamist insurgents have banned unrelated men and women from shaking hands, speaking or walking together."

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/01/10/somali-islamists-shaking-_n_806902.html

The image captures the mood and atmosphere of the protest and the protesters.


No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.
-Eleanor Roosevelt